Five U.S. Golf holes to play in your lifetime


There are hundreds of great golf holes in the United States that could qualify as must play golf holes before you die.  So we put together a list of five U.S. Golf holes that should be on your bucket list.  Be sure to tell us what golf holes would be on your bucket list below.

Augusta National-Augusta, Georgia, Private Course

Hole 12 Par 3 155 yards.

-Know as the “Golden Bell” this hole is famous for the Hogan Bridge which stands tall over Rae’s Creek that runs along the right side of the green.  Although the hole is the shortest on the course it is said to be the hardest to conquer.  The green is surrounded by three well placed bunkers and the wind adds another dimension of difficulty to this beauty of a hole that is the heart and soul of “Amen Corner.”  This course alone is on the top of many golfers’ bucket list, and hole 12 is the center piece of this legendary golf course.

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TPC Sawgrass- Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, Public Course

Hole 18 Par 4 447 yards.

-After you survive the famous 17th hole, you must now deal with this long and difficult par 4 dog leg left.  Said to be one of the most difficult driver tee shots in all of professional golf, one must carry 250 yards worth of water hazard that runs along left side of the fairway.  To make matters worse your second shot must also carry water and stay to the left side of the green, where the pin usually is set.  But don’t hit your approach shot to left or long as a lone bunker will be calling your name if you do so.  Safe to say this hole is not for the faint of heart.

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Cypress Point Club-Monterey California, Private Course

Hole 16 Par 3

-The signature hole to this beautiful course is this par 3 where you must hit a 231yard tee shot over the Pacific Ocean onto a green guarded by strategically placed bunkers.  The tee shot alone is a stunning view as you stare at an elevated cliff wall that seems to almost protect the green from the ocean waves.  If the beautiful view doesn’t distract you, the strong ocean wind in your face may make you consider laying up the left of the green in order to avoid losing your ball to the Pacific.   If you’re lucky enough to play this hole, make sure you take your time and enjoy the view, because it is probably the best in all of golf.

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Winged Foot-West Course-Mamaroneck, New York, Private Course

Hole 10 Par 3 188 yards.

-Experts say this is the toughest hole to play on the beautiful New York Country Club that has hosted the U.S. Open several times, most recently in 2006.  The green is slightly elevated and slopes to the front, which means that even if you are lucky enough to hit the green, it doesn’t necessarily mean you will have a good lie due to the green’s dramatic slopes and rolls.   Your view of the green from the tee box is intimidating as you have four bunkers surrounding the putting surface, protecting it like a fortress.  Golf legend Ben Hogan described the hole the best as, “a three iron into some guy’s bedroom.”

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TPC Sawgrass – Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, Public Course

Hole 17 Par 3 132 yards.

This hole is probably golf’s most well know and most recognizable holes.  Simply known to golfers as the “island green” this par 3 has made the difference in several Tour Championships.  The thing that makes this hole the most difficult is actually deciding the club selection for your initial shot.  With the ever changing wind conditions along with your capabilities with your irons, it is a very tough decision to make. Hit the ball too strong, you’re in the water. Hit the ball too short, you’re also in the water.  Your shot has to be just right.  In fact it has been said that players who play this hole are more fascinated by hitting the ball into the water than actually hitting the green. It has been estimated that over 100,000 balls are retrieved from the surrounding water every year!

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By guest writer J. Stark

Follow him on twitter @quack_pack

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