Are used and old putters worth taking out on the course still and can you learn something about your game by doing so? I think so and I’ll explain why.

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Since putting is probably the most precise moment in the game of golf, it is essential that you are proficient.  We have all heard the term, Drive for show, putt for dough.  There is a lot of truth behind that saying.  So how can we learn from taking out a old or used putter onto the golf course or practice putting greens?

Since their advent, putters have undergone major design innovations that lead us to today’s modern putters. Originally made out of forged iron, putters looked like most other golf clubs. Over time, changes were made to the putter’s shape and composition which improved their effectiveness. Today putters are for the most part L-shaped, and are split up into three different types: mallet, peripheral weighted, and blade.

So has the new technology behind putters made us worse at the craft?  I think it has.  If you take guys like Jack Nicklaus, Lee Trevino and Arnold Palmer, they all could roll them with the best.  Their putters didn’t have all the crazy alignment tools that some putters have today.  Can you imagine Jack Nicklaus or Bryon Nelson walking up to the green with a belly putter the size of a crater?  It would never happen.  These guys could stroke the ball better than any players of today and all with pretty much a hunk of metal.

I think golfers can learn something about their game by taking out some of the older clubs, especially putters.  It will teach you to be precise.  There are so many new putting aids on the market to help you strike the ball better while putting.  I don’t think there is a better tool on the market better than grabbing on old putter and heading out to the green.  You will find out quickly that a miss hit with the older putters was very noticeable.

By using an older putting during practice rounds and practice sessions, you will see where you are missing and then will be able to make adjustments to your putting stroke to be more precise.