Golf is the game of a lifetime, but you have to makes some adjustments to yourself and your game as you get older. As your body gets older, several things happen, and they will creep up on you most of the time. Here is what to look for.

You Lose Muscle Mass

One of the first signs that you are getting older is that you start to lose distance and there are several reasons for this. Generally, people lose about 1 percent of their lean muscle mass per year after age 40. Because of this, it tends to creep up on you slowly and invariably when it happens, your ego kicks in and you start trying to swing harder and the downward spiral begins.

You need to accept the fact that age takes a toll and adjust you golf game accordingly. I say this having learned from experience. I grew up using the driver to over-power the golf course and suddenly realized one day that I no longer could reach the par 5’s in two.

I started to enjoy the game much more when I parked my ego and started playing from the appropriate set of tees. Think about the adjustments that Jack Nicklaus and Arnold Palmer have had to make.

You Lose Flexibility

Here is another one that creeps up and causes loss of distance. One of the first and most apparent signs of aging is that we start to notice that we are losing flexibility. We think we are as limber and flexible as ever but then one morning you wake up and have trouble getting out of bed or tying your shoes. That’s when we realize that our bodies are just not the same anymore.

You Gain Weight

Unfortunately as you age, your metabolism slows down and if you don’t change your eating habits the pounds start add up. Like everything else, it creeps up on you.

One of the biggest effects of putting on pounds is how it affects your stamina. When you start to tire out easily. It affects both your brain and your body. The result is going to be bad decision making and poor golf shots. Your golf swing also starts to change to compromise your growing waistline.

The Good News

The good news is that you can minimize and delay the negative effects for a long time, but most people will have to make some adjustments in their lifestyle. You need to develop an exercise program that is specifically for golf. If you search using the term, “fitness training for golfers,” you will find a number of great suggestions.

Whatever you come up with needs to be centered on strengthening your core muscles and improving your flexibility. When you add exercise to your lifestyle and use a little common sense, the weight issue will take care of itself. From personal experience, I can tell you that the best single form of exercise, especially if you have any back issues, is simply a brisk walk. It is much more beneficial than running or jogging and the beauty of it is you can even do it when you play golf.

Adjust Your Golf Game

The key here is in dealing with your ego. Move up to the set of tees that is appropriate for how far you actually hit the ball on average. Also get properly fitted for golf clubs that will match you present swing speeds. One of the most common problems among golfers at any age is playing shafts that are too stiff.

Also switch to a golf ball that matches your swing speed and game. There is a 99.9% certainty that it is not going to be a Titleist Pro V.

You can see the improvements rather quickly by combining game adjustments and exercise.  Fitness needs to be a part of your daily routine and the sooner you start, the better. Don’t knock yourself out and jump in the deep end. It’s okay to start by going in the shallow end of the pool. Just start somewhere and play from where you should with the right equipment. Not only will you be able to hit the ball better, but you’ll look and feel better!